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Full text of "Report of the Trustees of the Cal. State Library (July 1904-June 1906)"

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California State Library 



Biennial Report 



OF THE 



California State Library 

fflKBm : i'- 1 906 f : 



BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 



FOR THE 



FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH FISCAL YEARS. 



JULY 1, 1904, TO JUNE 30, J906. 




SACRAMENTO: 

W. W. SHANNON, I I : SUPERINTENDENT OF STATE PRINTING. 

1907 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

TRUSTEES AND LIBRARY STAFF 4 

REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 7 

Catalog Department 7 

Reference and Loan Department 8 

California Historical Department 10 

Periodical Department 11 

Law Department 11 

Sociological Department 12 

Extension Department 13 

Library Publications 16 

Alterations at the Capitol 17 

Additional Space 17 

Effects of the San Francisco Fire 18 

Future Needs of the Library 19 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 22, 23, 24 

NUMBER OF VOLUMES IN LIBRARY 25 

LIST OF PERIODICALS 25 

LIST OF NEWSPAPERS 33 

PUBLIC, MISCELLANEOUS AND TRAVELING LIBRARIES, 1904 36 

PUBLIC, MISCELLANEOUS AND TRAVELING LIBRARIES, 1906 39 

REPORTS OF LIBRARIES OF CALIFORNIA, FOR YEAR ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1906 folders 



TRUSTEES. 



ALLEN B. LEMMON, President, - - Santa Rosa 

CHARLES S. GREENE, .... . Oakland 

BRADNER W. LEE, .... - Los Angeles 

JOSEPH STEFFENS, ... - - Sacramento 

W. C. VAN FLEET, San Francisco 

JAMES L. GILLIS, Secretary, Sacramento 



LIBRARY STAFF. 

At the Close of the Period Covered by This Report. 



JAMES L. GILLIS Librarian 

WM. R. WATSON Assistant Librarian and in charge of Law Department 

ERNEST BRUNCKEN Chief of Sociological Department 

MISS MARGARET EASTMAN, Chief Deputy and in charge of Order Department 

MISS D. I. ENNIS Reference Librarian 

MISS MARY L. SUTLIFF Chief of Catalog Department 

MISS AMY L. PHELAN Cataloger 

MRS. ANNIE L. BLANCH ARD Shelf Lister 

MISS EUDORA GAROUTTE Chief of California Historical Department 

MISS ALICE J. HAINES Assistant in California Historical Department 

MISS ANNIE LOWRY In charge of Periodicals and Binding 

MISS LAURA STEFFENS Chief of Extension Department 

MISS MABEL R. GILLIS Assistant in Extension Department 

MISS BERTHA KUMLI Library Organizer 

MISS MABEL E. PRENTISS Library Organizer 

MRS. SARAH A. HUTCHINSON General Assistant 

MISS ALICE HASSETT Apprentice 

J. W. GORMAN Stenographer 

WM. H. LUGG Shipping Clerk 

VICTOR CORDANO Janitor 



State of California, 
Department of the State Library, 

Sacramento, Cal., June 30, 1906. 



To his Excellency, George C. Pardee, 

Governor of California. 

Sir : I have the honor to submit the Biennial Report of the State 
Librarian for the two years ending June 30, 1906. 
By order of the State Board of Library Trustees. 

ALLEN B. LEMMON, President; 
BRADNER W. LEE, Trustee; 
CHAS. S. GREENE, Trustee; 
W. C. VAN FLEET, Trustee; 
JOS. STEFFENS, Trustee. 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees of the California State Library — 
Gentlemen : I have the honor of submitting my report covering 
the transactions of the State Library for the fifty-sixth and fifty- 
seventh fiscal years, ending June 30, 1906. 



Balance on hand July r, 1904 $25,834 50 

Amount received during fifty-sixth and fifty-seventh fiscal years 66,500 00 

Total $92,334 50 

Expenditures during fifty-sixth and fifty-seventh fiscal years 84,049 24 

Balance June 30, 1906 $8,825 26 



A detailed financial statement is appended (Appendices A and B), 
showing debits and credits for each fiscal year, also total expenditures 
for the two fiscal years (Appendix C). 

Owing to the necessity of moving and storing a large part of the 
Library on account of the alterations on the Capitol, a large con- 
tingent expense was incurred by the Library for labor, material, etc. 

At the thirty-sixth session of the Legislature, Section 416 of the 
Political Code was so amended as to provide a monthly income of 
$3,000 in place of the $2,500 previously received. This amendment 
became effective in June, 1905. 

BOOKS. 

For a detailed statement of the number of volumes added to the 
Library, see Appendix D. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

In the new card catalog the Library of Congress and A. L. A. cards 
have been used whenever possible, the written work being done on 
typewriters. Authors, titles and subjects are combined in one alphabet 
and much analytic work has been done. Started in October, 1904, the 
catalog now fills a Library Bureau case of seventy trays and will very 
soon require enlarged quarters. Besides being included in the general 
catalog, a separate catalog of Californiana has been made for use in the 
California Department. The lack of a subject catalog for a great 
majority of the books results in a great loss of time, as well as an 
immense loss in the efficiency of the Library. 



8 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



At present it is necessary to consult four different catalogs to deter- 
mine the resources of the Library. These are: the printed catalog of 
1889 and its supplement of 1898; a card catalog of the accessions 
between 1898 and 1903, and the new card catalog which includes the 
accessions from 1904 to date, together with the Calif orniana and some 
old material re-cataloged. Of these, the printed catalogs are confined 
almost entirely to author entries with very few cross-references. The 
old written catalog gives author, title and to some extent subject entries. 
Call numbers are omitted from most of the cards as well as from printed 
catalogs. 

In re-cataloging old material, it was decided to take first, as far as 
possible, the books contained in the old card catalog. With a view 
to accomplishing that work, most of these books were transferred to 
Maple Hall, to which place it became necessary to move the staff on 
account of the alterations on the Capitol Building which necessitated 
the closing of the Library. There were two reasons why these books 
were selected to be re-cataloged before the others: first, because they 
were mostly works of comparatively recent date, and second, because it 
was very desirable to eliminate one entire catalog, thus making it nec- 
essary to look for books in only three places instead of four. 

It is proposed to catalog the English history section as soon as pos- 
sible, and the traveling card catalog on this subject was ordered from 
the Library of Congress in order to facilitate the ordering of cards for 
the work. It is hoped that in time one subject after another can be 
finished and added to the new catalog; but with the present force, con- 
sisting of only two people, it is impossible to do much more than keep 
up with the current work. There should be at least three catalogers in 
addition to the Chief Cataloger, if any apparent impression is to be made 
on the work of re-cataloging the Library, and even more help in that 
department could be used to advantage, until all the work has been 
finished. 

The work of completing the new catalog has a very practical bearing 
on the work of all the other departments, because of the greatly increased 
efficiency of the collection as a whole, and because of the great amount 
of time that would be saved by both the public and the staff. 

REFERENCE AND LOAN DEPARTMENT. 

This department, as at present conducted, was organized early in 1906. 
It has been the policy of the Library to lend books from the general 
department to State officers, including members of the Legislature while 
in session, to emploj-es working in the Capitol, and to such persons as 
held permits signed by a State officer. This practically limited the circu- 
lation to the residents of Sacramento, with a few rare exceptions where 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



9 



books were sent to persons securing the signature of a superior judge, 
which constituted the only means available for non-residents of Sacra- 
mento to borrow books. 

With a view to enlarging the usefulness of the Library, the regula- 
tions were so changed that any resident of the State may now borrow 
books by making application through a local library, a State traveling 
library, a registered study club or a superior judge. In towns where 
there is no library, traveling library, registered study club or superior 
judge, special arrangements have been made with the Wells Fargo 
Company by which their agent will vouch for the identity of the person 
to whom the book is sent. 

It is believed that this Department will be of great assistance to educa- 
tional institutions, small libraries and individuals, not only by lending 
books, but by supplying information on any subject. All inquiries are 
answered by letter unless the data is too comprehensive to be contained 
in one of ordinary length. In such cases the necessary book, or books, 
will be forwarded in accordance with the rules for out-of-town loans. 
Unless certain works are asked for, those which seem to best cover the 
subject will be sent. When the desired information is contained only 
in books which can not be permitted to leave the Library, special 
arrangements must be made to have the matter typewritten. 

There is a large collection of reference material to draw from, the 
value of which will be greatly increased as soon as it is properly cata- 
loged. The rules have been made as liberal as it is possible to make them 
and still protect the property of the State. 

Owing to the necessity of storing practically all the books comprising 
the general collection of the Library, the work of the Department has 
necessarily been suspended until such a time as the books are again 
available. In the meantime, however, preparations for increasing the 
efficiency of the Department are steadily going on. New books are 
being purchased, bibliographies and reading lists on various subjects 
are being collected and classified, and a great amount of other material 
prepared for future use. 

The work has not been in actual operation a sufficient length of time 
to demonstrate its advantages, or the problems which may have to be 
met. The latter will have to be worked out gradually as conditions and 
experience dictate. 

The regular work of the Loan Department with the State officials, 
schools, clubs and residents of Sacramento has increased during the last 
year. The State officers have used the Library more freely than ever 
before, calling upon the different departments for reference material and 
books to aid them in their work. 

The public school pupils have been spending their study hours in 
the Reference room, where such books as they require have been placed. 



10 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



A collection of works on English literature, and American, Greek and 
English history was placed in this room for the use of the high school 
pupils. The teachers have been supplied with blank application cards, 
which, when properly filled out, entitle a pupil to withdraw any ref- 
erence book he may require and keep it from the time the Library 
closes until the following morning. The high schools throughout the 
State have called upon the Library for material when preparing for 
debates and writing essays. 

The art clubs send their programs to the Department, with 
suggestive lists of books. These lists are checked with the Library 
catalogs, additional material provided and many new books ordered 
to further assist them in their studies. The valuable art books and 
reproductions from the large galleries have been greatly appreciated 
by these clubs, but until they are properly brought out in the catalog 
and a suitable room provided for their display, they can not be of the 
value and service they should be. 

A collection of books on architecture and allied subjects has been 
loaned to the Mechanics' Library of San Francisco to assist them in 
supplying the demand for such works. 

CALIFORNIA HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT. 

There has been a steady growth in this Department and the material 
has been put in much better shape for consultation. The special 
catalog of Californiana now contains some 6,000 cards, representing the 
re-cataloging of a considerable part of the collection. It is hoped that 
most of the remaining books can be finished during the re-construction 
of the Capitol. 

Practically all of the easily obtained books relating to California are 
now in the Library. In order to make the collection as complete as 
possible, it is necessary to spend a great deal of time on second-hand 
dealers' catalogs and in searching through similar sources for the old and 
rare volumes that can be obtained in no other way. The prices it is 
necessary to pay in order to secure this material may sometimes seem 
high, but it should be borne in mind that the supply of such books is 
very- limited, while the buyers, and consequently the prices, are steadily 
increasing. 

A valuable recent acquisition is a bound volume entitled" Hydrography 
and history of the west coast of the United States," by Dr. Johann Georg 
Kohl. The half-title reads "Maritime history and hydrographic descrip- 
tion of the coasts and seas of the United States, vol. 4 the western 
coast." This is the original manuscript of the fourth part of the com- 
plete work, a manuscript copy of which is in the archives of the U. S. 
Coast and Geodetic Survey. Much valuable material in the shape of old 
accounts, letters and historical documents has also been collected. 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



11 



The location of historical matter is the first step in its collection. 
This is accomplished by a system of general advertising and through the 
kindness of friends and interested parties. In order to secure this 
material after it is located, it is often necessary to arouse an interest in 
the work of the Department by calling attention to the importance of 
placing what is of historical value in a collection where it will benefit 
the public. Personal interviews and letters are the most effective means 
of accomplishing this. 

The Department has recently sent circulars to all the newspapers in 
the State, also to the members of pioneer societies and commercial 
organizations. Biographical cards and circulars are being sent to Cali- 
fornia authors to which they are responding most satisfactorily, not 
alone with biographical sketches but also with books, manuscripts, 
autograph letters, etc. Similar cards will soon be sent to early settlers 
and prominent citizens. 

Since my last report, the Library has acquired a very valuable aid in 
the printed index to the San Francisco "Call" for the years 1894 to 
1903. This work, in five volumes, is very comprehensive and exceed- 
ingly valuable, as it covers a period not yet reached by the Library 
index, which embraces the period from 1846 to 1884. When the inter- 
vening years have been indexed, furnishing a record of events from 1846 
to 1894, the time of the beginning of the "Call" index, it is the inten- 
tion to take up some of the other very early papers and index them for 
periods covering the most important events of the State's early history. 

The Library has as yet been unable to secure a file of an early Southern 
California paper. It is very desirable that there should be such a file 
here, as the papers we have contain very meager accounts of life and 
events in the southern part of the State. 

The work of increasing the efficiency of the Department is being very 
vigorously prosecuted in our temporary quarters at Maple Hall. 

PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

We are now receiving regularly 378 periodicals, exclusive of news- 
papers. Of this number 55 are donated. All the periodicals indexed in 
the "Annual Literary Index" and the "Reader's Guide" are received, 
and many of those indexed in the " Engineering Index." 

We also receive 117 newspapers, of which 88 are donated. 

For an itemized list of the current newspapers and periodicals, see 
Appendices E and F. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

There has been an increased use of the Law Department, which 
has been especially noticeable since the establishment of the Appellate 



12 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



Court. Not only has the attendance been increased, but a great deal 
of additional work and expense have been incurred on account of the 
necessity for collecting, binding and indexing the records of the three 
districts. The bound records of the Supreme Court alone have added 
about 100 large volumes to the Library each year, and this number will 
of course be greatly increased by the output from the three districts 
of the Appellate Court. The time required for the proper care of these 
records and their preparation for the use of the public is by no means 
inconsiderable. Additional shelving has been placed in the Depart- 
ment, which has afforded some relief, but the books in certain sections 
are still in a very crowded condition. 

A general change in the style of binding has been inaugurated, and 
wberever possible, buckram is used in place of calf or sheep. In ad- 
dition to being a much more durable binding, the buckram is in most 
cases cheaper. The large law publishing houses are recognizing the 
value of this style of binding and are using it more than ever before. 

In order to provide the Supreme Court at San Francisco with the 
necessary books to carry on its work after the fire, two extra sets of 
California Reports, California Statutes and California Codes were sent 
to the Supreme Court Library, together with such other volumes as 
could be spared. The Attorney-General was also supplied with a 
considerable number of volumes. 

SOCIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

This Department was established in December, 1904, for the purpose of 
furnishing information on all subjects connected with the administration 
of public affairs, to officials both State and local, as well as to all others 
interested. One of the most practical features of the work is the assist- 
ance given to members of the Legislature and to legislative committees 
during the sessions. 

The Department has been located in the Law Library for the con- 
venience of the people who desire such information as is furnished by 
it, and because the chief of the Department has occasion to use the Law 
Library frequently. 

The work has for its object a close correlation of the Library with the 
entire public life of the State. 

We are acquiring the valuable new books in the line of economics, 
comparative legislation and allied branches in the English language, 
and are filling out the gaps in the older and foreign literature. A col- 
lection of public documents of all kinds, pamphlets and fugitive publi- 
cations is also being gathered together. All of this material is being 
made as available as possible by means of indexes, notes, etc. 

As the Department was established but a few weeks before the 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



13 



convening of the Legislature of 1905, it was impossible to do very 
much in the way of preparation, but notwithstanding this handicap, a 
great deal of aid and information was furnished to the members of 
the Senate and House and to many of the State officers. 

During the past year the collection and arrangement of material for 
use during the next session have gone steadily forward, and considerable 
work has been done for the committees on Taxation and Revenue, 
Prison and Reform, Building and Loan Associations, and Schools, which 
were appointed to report at the next session. 

While the work of the Department is done primarily for the use of 
the public officials, State and local, it is also at the disposal of any other 
person, and organizations dealing with matters of public concern 
especially are invited to make use of it. 

Assistance is given in the search for court decisions, in drawing bills 
and in every other way possible. 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 

The work of this Department has increased to such an extent that it 
seemed advisable to divide it into four divisions: 

Traveling Libraries Division. 
Study Club Division. 
Public Libraries Division. 
Books for the Blind Division. 

Through this Department the Library is doing the work which in 
many states is under the supervision of a public library commission. 

Traveling Library Division. 

At the date of my last report, this work had been in operation for a 
period of about six months, and at the end of that period there were 85 
libraries in use, representing a total of 4,250 volumes. At the present 
time, the number of libraries in use is 225 and the total number of vol- 
umes 11,250. The charge of $3.00 for the use of the libraries, to cover 
cost of transportation, has been withdrawn, so that any community 
without a public library can now secure a traveling library free of any 
charge whatever, as the State pays the transportation both ways. This 
provision is more liberal than is offered by any other state, so far as I 
have been able to ascertain. 

There are now 291 communities in California that have formed library 
associations for the purpose of borrowing traveling libraries. Sonoma 
stands first among the counties, with a total of 20. Every county in the 
State is represented except San Francisco, which is supplied by the San 
Francisco Public Library and its branches. During the summer months 



14 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



the demand for libraries is considerably lighter than at other seasons, 
otherwise it would be impossible for the present force to handle the work. 

The traveling libraries have in many cases created a desire for a 
local library, and a number of beginnings of this sort have already been 
made. 

Study Club Division. 

A study club library is a collection of books dealing with some specific 
subject. These libraries are made up for the use of study clubs through- 
out the State and are intended to encourage the foundation and mainte- 
nance of such clubs. They include books considered to be of service to 
students of the subject, either for information, inspiration or illustration. 

Clubs desiring to use these libraries must be registered at the State 
Library and conform to certain conditions. They must have five or more 
members, a president and secretary, a program providing for at least five 
meetings covering a period of not less than five weeks, a subject sufficiently 
limited to make its satisfactory study possible in the time provided by the 
program, and an annual report transmitted before June ist of each year. 
A fee of $1.50 for each twenty-five (or less) books must be paid toward 
the expense of service. This fee, however, covers the cost of transpor- 
tation both ways. 

So far, these libraries have been selected from the main collection of 
the Library. As the demand increases, however, it will be necessary to 
purchase duplicate volumes for this purpose. 

Owing to the fact that practically all the books are stored during the 
alteration of the Capitol, it will not be possible for some time to carry on 
this work. A great deal of interest has been manifested in the Depart- 
ment and the indications are that there will be a great demand for these 
libraries. 

Public Libraries Division. 

In November, 1905, two library organizers were placed in the field to 
encourage the establishment of libraries, to visit those already estab- 
lished, and to give advice and assistance to public libraries throughout 
the State in regard to library methods, library buildings, etc. Successful 
libraries are visited that their methods may be observed and suggested 
in other places. Requests from libraries needing advice or assistance are 
answered by a visit from the organizer if possible, and such assistance 
as can be rendered by letter is furnished in the meantime. The actual 
work of organizing libraries is sometimes completed in a visit of two or 
three days, but frequently several visits are necessary. 

The methods employed vary according to conditions. If there is a 
Promotion Society or an Improvement Club, the work is begun by visits 
to the members of the executive committee and attendance at a regular or 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



15 



special meeting where the law is explained and the proposition is talked 
over. Usually a committee is at once appointed to circulate the petitions 
and the library is established with the strong backing of the Promotion 
Society or Improvement Club. 

When there is no organization of this nature, the work may be com- 
menced by the aid of a woman's club, a fraternal order, superintendents 
of schools, or perhaps one enthusiastic citizen. The point is to gain the 
interest of the town. More time is required in such cases, for in a town 
where all are strangers and no previous effort has been made to start a 
library, it is hard to secure the aid of those who can give the necessary 
assistance. 

There is rarely active opposition to the establishment of a public 
library, but often there are reasons urged why such a step should not 
be taken at once. Sometimes a town has a library association which 
solicits subscriptions from the citizens, and thus maintains a free library. 
A town may be heavily bonded and the tax rate already high, in which 
case there is a very natural objection to anything which will increase it. 
Newly incorporated towns have many other things to demand their 
attention — sewers, street work, lights and water — and can rarely be 
persuaded that the establishment of a public library should not be 
delayed for a year or two. Almost without exception, however, the 
first visit of the organizer results in a discussion of libraries and the 
value of one to a town. Even this is worth while. 

Twenty-seven towns have been visited for the purpose of organizing 
public libraries, and the necessary ordinance has already been passed in 
sixteen of these towns. 

In order to secure uniformity in the methods and records used by the 
different libraries, a number of forms have been prepared to be used as 
samples. These forms are such as are necessary in nearly all small 
libraries, and in their preparation the matter of simplicity and economy 
has been kept in mind. 

Many letters of commendation and appreciation of the work have 
been received from various parts of the State and a vast amount of good 
has been accomplished. 

This division keeps on file the annual reports of all the libraries of 
the State, so that the latest official information is always at hand. 

Books for the Blind Division. 

The work of sending out embossed books for the blind was begun in 
June, 1905. These books are sent to any blind resident of the State 
upon application. As the Government makes no charge for carrying 
embossed books in the mails, when sent to, or by, a blind person, no 
cost of transportation is incurred. 

Books in four different type are in use, including the New York 
Point, American Braille, Boston Line Letter, and Moon. 



1(1 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



The total number of accessions is 550 and the borrowers, numbering 
169, are scattered over all parts of the State. Since the Department 
began loaning books, 16 borrowers, whose ages range from 38 to 91 
years and who could not read any type before, have learned to read 
either the Moon type or the New York Point, or both. Besides these, 
there are 15 who knew some type and have learned to read one or two 
others. 

A circular and finding list of the books is sent to all who apply for it. 
In addition to lending books to individuals, the Library sends out collec- 
tions of from 10 to 25 books to such public libraries as will agree to 
loan the books free of charge to any blind applicant. 

The type preferred by most readers is the New York Point. The 
Moon type is particularly adapted to old people who are learning to 
read. A magazine for the blind, called the Moon magazine, is sub- 
scribed for and the separate numbers loaned in the order of application 
for them. 

LIBRARY PUBLICATIONS. 

In November, 1905, the Library began the publication of a small 
pamphlet called " News Notes." In May, 1906, the name was changed 
to " News Notes of California Libraries," and the size was greatly 
enlarged. This publication contains a vast amount of information on 
library conditions in the State, as well as information about the State 
Library and California Library Association. The matter formerly con- 
tained in the Quarterly Bulletin is now contained in the "News Notes 
of California Libraries" every three months, and the Bulletin has been 
discontinued. 

A number of circulars have been issued from time to time, as follows: 

Executive Department: 

Rules for Library Service. 

Reference and Loan Department: 

Rules for use of the Department. 

California Historical Department: 
Author Cards. 
Pioneer Cards. 

Various circulars and circular letters sent out for the purpose of collecting his- 
torical material and information in regard to California. 

Extension Department: 

Circular and finding lists of Books for the Blind. 
Rules for lending Traveling Libraries. 
Rules for lending Study Club Libraries. 
" Why a town should incorporate." 



RHPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



17 



ALTERATIONS AT THE CAPITOL. 

The Legislature, at its session of 1905, made an appropriation of 
$352,925 for the remodeling of the Capitol Building. On account of 
these alterations, it became necessary last April to make preparations 
for vacating the library quarters above the first floor. 

The only available space in the Library for the storage of books was 
the alcoves 011 the second floor. This space was very limited, so that 
it became necessary to secure quarters outside the Capitol for the storage 
of the bulk of the books. The basement of the building at Eleventh 
and K streets was secured and put in shape for this purpose, but this 
room was quickly filled and it became necessary to secure more space. 
The Trustees of the Sacramento Public Library very kindly put at our 
disposal the portion of the basement under the new addition to their 
building. By putting a rough floor in this room we secured abundant 
additional space, and without further expense than the laying of a floor. 

In addition to finding a place to put the books, it became necessary to 
locate the staff where the work could be carried on with as little 
interruption as possible. We were fortunate in securing for this purpose 
Maple Hall, located on Sixth, near K. This hall furnishes ample room 
for the accommodation of the staff and the material necessary to carry 
on the work. As the main collection of books is stored, and as the hall 
is not adapted for the use of readers, all work with the public was aban- 
doned except the work carried on by the Extension Department, the 
Law and Sociological Departments, and, to a very limited extent, the 
work of the California Historical Department. 

Packing and moving the books involved a great amount of labor. 
Most of the public documents were wrapped in bundles of ten or twelve 
volumes and tied up with coarse, soft twine. All the other volumes 
which were sent away from the Capitol, except newspapers, were stored 
in boxes. 

Owing to a slight change in the original plan, it will probably not be 
necessary to move the Law Library. This is exceedingly fortunate, as 
otherwise the work of the Law Department as well as of the Sociological 
Department would have been very seriously interrupted. 

ADDITIONAL SPACE. 

By the alterations on the Capitol, the Library loses the room formerly 
used as the Librarian's office, the periodical and reading room, half of 
the catalog room, and half of the California room. The additional space 
gained consists of the new rooms made over the Senate and Assembly 
chambers and a space connecting these wings with the circular room 
over the Library proper. Provision has been made for a Library elevator 

2— LR 



18 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



and a good service can be established between the different floors. In 
addition to the space in the attic, the basement under the Law Depart- 
ment will be made available for use. 

It is impossible to say just how much room these changes will give 
us. The books were previously in a very crowded condition and it 
remains to be seen how much additional space will have been gained 
when they are rearranged on the shelves. 

EFFECTS OF THE SAN FRANCISCO FIRE. 

The Library sustained practically no direct loss as a result of the San 
Francisco fire. There were two or three books lost which were in use 
in San Francisco, but that was the extent of our direct loss. 

As a result of the fire, the contents of the Library have increased very 
appreciably in value. The immense loss of rare and valuable historical 
material and of the court records in San Francisco has made it doubly 
necessary for us to take every precaution against fire. While the exten- 
sion of the Capitol will give us some needed space for a time, it will not 
give us that immunity from fire which the value of the Library warrants. 

There is a very real and pressing need for a suitable and fire-proof 
building in order that the accumulations of years may be thoroughly 
protected. The material being collected, which could never be replaced 
in case of loss, is increasing rapidly year by year, and the danger from 
fire, although it may be reduced in the remodeled Capitol, will continue 
to be a menace. 

At the last session of the New York Legislature, a bill was passed 
appropriating $4,000,000 for a building for the state library and state 
educational department, $400,000 being made immediately available for 
the purchase of a site. California does not need any such enormous 
expenditure as this for a building, and the matter of site would not have 
to be considered, as there is ample room in the Capitol grounds, but some 
steps should be taken at once looking to the better housing and pro- 
tection of the Library. 

It should be borne in mind that the planning and construction of 
such a building will require considerable time after its authorization. 
It is a library maxim that a library building should be built from the 
inside out, if you wish to provide for economy of administration. Many 
library buildings are badly arranged and built, owing to a lack of 
knowledge of the requirements to be met, and a hasty construction. 
When the State of California erects a State Library building, as it surely 
must do in the near future if the Library is not destioyed by fire in the 
meantime, all the plans and details should be thoroughly and deliberately 
considered, in order that the State's money may be wisely expended, and 
that the building may stand as a model, in so far as it may, to the smaller 
libraries of the State. 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



19 



FUTURE NEEDS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The growth of all departments during the past two years is but an 
indication of what may be expected in the future. There is need for 
additional assistance in nearly every department, and in order to main- 
tain the standard that has been set, it will be necessary to make provision 
for increasing the staff in the near future. 

We are accomplishing a greater amount of work with a smaller staff 
than most similar institutions. Not only has the amount of new work 
increased greatly, but a better grade of work is being done. 

Although our activities at the present time cover many lines never 
even considered a few years ago, we have by no means exhausted the 
possibilities of usefulness; we are, in fact, merely at the threshold of our 
opportunities. With sufficient financial support, we shall be able to 
double the efficiency of this Library and stimulate very greatly the 
library interests throughout the State. That we have been able to 
accomplish as much as we have, has been due to the considerable sur- 
plus which had accumulated in the treasury. In order to carry on the 
work we are doing, it has been necessary to draw upon this surplus 
constantly, until now it is evident that within a few months it will be 
entirely used up. We have used the surplus only where the needs 
of the work required us to do so, and because we believe the appropri- 
ations made for the maintenance of the Library were made with the 
expectation that they would be expended for the benefit of the Library, 
rather than that they should accumulate as a surplus. 

In order to keep up the work as conducted at present, and to extend 
it as should be done, a more liberal appropriation will be necessary. 
Our annual income as compared with the most important libraries in 
this country is very small, as is shown by the following statement, 
which is made up from the latest information obtainable: 



Annual Income, in round numbers, of a few of the Most Important Libraries in 

the United States. 



Library. 



Population 
1900 


No. of 
Employes 


Received 
from Ap- 
propriation 


560,892 


275 


$305,000 


1, 166,582 


244 


322,l8l 


352,387 


82 


76,615 


1.698,575 


175 


220,000 


325.9 2 


IOO 


130,000 


202,718 


27 


64,313 


381,768 


245 


169,601 


7,268,021 




136,720 


1,293,697 


168 


144,000 


32I,6l6 


106 


200,000 


575.238 


60 


180,000 


2,069,042 


38 


50,000 


1,485,053 


19 


36.OOO 



Received 
from Other 
Sources. 



Total. 



Boston Public 

Brooklyn Public 

Buffalo Public 

Chicago Public 

Cincinnati Public 

Minneapolis Public 

Cleveland Public 

New York State 

Philadelphia Public 

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Library. . 

St. Louis Public 

Wisconsin State Historical So- 
ciety Library, Law Library, 
and Free Library Commission 

California State Library 



$16,080 
11,013 



4,164 

96,985 



17,896 



15,000 
6,600 



$321,080 
322,181 
87,628 
220,000 
130,000 

68,477 
266,586 
136,720 
161,896 
200,000 
1 So, 000 



65,000 
42,600 



20 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



A brief consideration of this table will show how very small is the 
appropriation of the California State Library as compared with the 
appropriations made for library purposes by leading cities having a 
population of from 200,000 to 1,700,000. It is interesting to note that 
Brooklyn, which most nearly approximates California in the matter of 
population, appropriates over seven and one-half times as great an 
amount for the maintenance of its library. The State of Wisconsin, 
which closely corresponds with this State in its library activities, 
appropriates more than half as much again as California, and the area 
to be covered is only a fraction of that in this State. 

In former years, when the Library was not especially active, the 
appropriation was ample for its needs, but there is no comparison 
between the work of the Library a few years ago and its work to-day. 

It should be borne in mind that $22,423.25 of the expenditures of the 
past two years were for the maintenance of the Traveling Libraries, 
Blind, and Public Libraries departments, and this source of expense 
had not to be taken into account in former years, so that in reality the 
Library proper has actually a smaller income at its disposal than it 
formerly had, and its work has increased greatly. Its power to use a 
large income wisely in past years was limited, but with its activities in 
all directions tremendously enlarged, and with the work of a state 
library commission on its hands, its ability to use a larger fund has 
grown correspondingly. The appropriation, though increased, is not 
equal to the rapidly growing needs of the Library. The work has 
grown in a vastly greater proportion than the income. 

At no time in the history of the world has there been a larger output 
of good new publications than at present, and many of these should be 
found in every library that makes any pretense to completeness. With 
our present appropriation, not only are we unable to purchase many of 
the new works that we should have, but we can do very little toward 
completing the various sets of proceedings, periodicals, etc., which the 
public might naturally expect to find here. 

I most earnestly urge upon the Board the necessity of securing such 
legislation as will enable us to carry out the work already planned and 
to undertake such new work as properly falls to the lot of this Library. 
It should be borne in mind that an additional income does not require 
the making of a distinct appropriation, as the money is derived from the 
fees received by the Secretary of State for filing articles of incorporation 
and other papers. These fees amounted to $377,739.60 in the last two 
years, and as they were raised at the last session of the Legislature, the 
receipts will be very much greater for the coming two years. 

The Library is of more use and value to the members of the Legisla- 
ture, as well as to every one else, than ever before, and more members 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



21 



are taking advantage of the opportunities it offers. It is important that 
the work should be kept up in all departments to the highest standard, 
and in order to do this it will be necessary to obtain a larger revenue 
for maintenance. 

In conclusion, I wish to make public recognition of the efficiency and 
loyal support of the staff. At no time in the history of the Library have 
the members of the staff shown a more earnest interest in their work, a 
stronger sense of responsibility toward their duties, or a better esprit de 
corps. It is largely due to their cordial cooperation that it has been 
possible to carry on the work of the Library so successfully during the 
past two years. 

J. L. GILLIS, 

State Librarian. 



22 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



APPENDIX A. 



DE.BITS FOR FIFTY-SIXTH FISCAL YLAR, 
July 1 . 1 904, to July 1 , 1 905. 



1904. 

July 1— To balance 011 hand $77460 

July 4— Warrant 5 .627 27 

July 7— Traveling library fees 9 00 

Aug. 6— Warrant 3.225 7* 

Sept. 3— Warrant 2,022 16 

Sept. 13— Traveling library lees 7200 

Sept. 13— Payment lost book 1 85 

Oct. 5— Warrant 2,158 81 

Oct. 31 — Traveling library fees 60 00 

Oct. 31 -Lost books 3 00 

Oct. 31— Fines 5 00 

Nov. 3— Warrant 2,270 65 

Nov. 3— Warrant .. . 3,20980 

Dec. 7— Traveling library fees 12 00 

Dec. 7— Damage to book 20 



1905- 

Jan. 3-Warrant $4.335 70 

Feb. 2— Warrant 5,368 95 

Mar. 4 — Warrant 2,679 57 

Mar. 20 — Damaged book 80 

Mar. 20- Lost books 2 75 

Mar. 20 — Damaged books 15 

Mar 20 — Lost book 1 50 

Apr. 5— Warrant 3,867 56 

May 3— Warrant 4,086 50 

June 3— Warrant 3,089 10 

June 3 — Lostboxes. 1 75 

June 3— Fines 5 00 

Total $42,891 43 

Credits lor fifty-sixth fiscal year 41,941 83 

Balance July 1, 1905 $949 60 



CREDITS FIFTY-SIXTH FISCAL YLAR, 
July 1, 1904, to July 1, 1905. 



General , Traveling 
Department.; Libraries. 



Blind. 



Books 

Subscriptions 

Salaries 

Printing and binding 

Furniture and carpets 

Wells Fargo, cartage and freight 

Meetings 

Telegraph and telephones 

Postage 

Permanent improvements 

Book cases and boxes 

L. C. cards and A. L. A 

Miscellaneous 

Exhibit 



Totals $35,031 83 I5.97S 50 



$8,347 
1,202 
12,518 
3.138 
1.397 
348 
637 
227 
205 
4,592 



$i,S42 67 



55 1 
974 ' 
1.387 ' 



1,810 53 
983 40 

662 78 



565 68 
113 44 



$497 85 



361 50 
18 50 



53 65 



»93i 50 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



23 



APPLNDIX B. 



DLBIT5 FOR FIFTY-SLVLNTH FISCAL YLAR, 
July 1, 1905, to July 1, 1906. 



I9°5- 

July i — Balance on hand ... $949 60 

July 1 — Warrant .. _ 2,614 05 

Aug. 3— Warrant 2,746 38 

Aug. 3 — Lost and damaged books 13 65 

Aug. 3— Fines.. _ 9 00 

Sept. 2— Warrant 2,490 02 

Sept. 13 — Lost and damaged books 3 25 

Oct. 4— Warrant 2,721 50 

Nov. 4 — Warrant 2,798 32 

Nov. 28 — Lost books 2 50 

Nov. 28— Fines . 10 00 

Dec. 2 — Warrant 2,84s 90 

1906. 

Jan. 3— Warrant 4,815 86 

Feb. 3 — Warrant 3,761 01 

Feb. 8 — Lost books _ 1000 

Feb. 8— Book sold . 75 

Mar. 3 — Warrant _ 3,509 15 

Mar. 28 — Lost books 5 60 

Mar. 28— Study Club fee... 1 50 



1906. 
Mar. 28 
Apr. 4 
Apr. 7 
Apr. 7 
Apr. 7 
May 5 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
June 1 
June 4 



Books sold 

■Warrant 

Sale of glass doors 

Fines.. 

Rebate on scrip book 

Warrant 

Study Club fees 

Books lost 

Express charges returned. 

Fines 

Books sold 

Warrant 

June 16 — Books sold 

June 16— Books lost 

June 29— Books sold 

June 30— Books sold... 



Total - 

Credits for fifty-seventh fiscal year. 

Balance July 1,1906... $i,337 29 



$10 00 

■ 4,735 15 

35 00 
5 00 
5 54 

- 5,284 52 
4 50 
3 40 

2 95 

3 3° 
135 00 

■ 3.782 55 

41 00 
2 60 

36 00 
38 00 

. $43,444 70 
. 42,107 41 



CRLDIT5 FIFTY-5LVLNTH FISCAL YLAR, 
July 1, 1905, to July 1, 1906. 



Items. 


General De- 
partment. 


Traveling 
Libraries. 


Blind. 


Public 
Libraries. 


Moving. 


Total. 


Books 


$5,612 47 
1,306 39 

13,186 21 
2,164 70 
146 75 

128 84 

129 95 
688 50 
224 55 
317 00 
148 5° 


$6,167 16 


$180 64 






$11,960 27 

1,306 39 
17,494 77 

3,782 25 
150 75 

1,182 02 
442 79 
688 50 
227 33 
363 7° 
171 25 

1,130 73 
202 16 
847 20 
105 00 
701 64 

1,350 66 


Subscriptions 






Salaries 


2,342 38 
1,355 15 
4 00 
1,052 63 
161 32 


766 18 
115 75 


$1,200 00 
146 65 




Printing and binding. 




Furniture and carpets 




Wells Fargo . 


55 
36 52 






Cartage and freight. 




$115 00 


Meetings 




Telegraph and telephones 

Postage 






2 78 




36 70 
22 75 
878 78 


10 00 




Permanent improvements 

Book cases and boxes 








33 50 


218 45 


L- C. cards and A. L. A. 

Traveling expenses 

Rent 


202 16 
91 40 






755 80 








105 00 
701 64 
86 53 


Labor 










Miscellaneous 


1,020 12 


138 65 


25 50 


79 86 


Totals 


$25,367 54 


$12,159 52 


$1,135 14 


$2,218 59 


$1,226 62 


$42,107 41 





24 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



APPLNDIX C 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES, FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH 
FISCAL YEARS, 

July 1, 1904 to July I, 1906. 



Items. 


General De- 
partment. 


Traveling 
Libraries. 


Blind. 


Public 
Libraries. 


Moving 

from 
Capitol. 


Total. 


Books 

Subscriptions 


$i3.96o 39 
2.508 47 
25,704 81 
5.303 20 
1.543 99 
128 84 
478 58 
1.325 50 
452 II 
522 48 
4.741 28 


$8,009 83 


$678 49 






$22,648 71 
2,508 47 
32,185 40 
7,922 65 
1.547 99 
1 1S2 02 
l.5<>7 85 
1.325 50 
454 89 
569 18 
4."64 03 
1,696 41 
257 I 6 
847 20 
105 00 
701 64 
1.387 00 
2,438 14 


Salaries 


4.152 91 
2.338 55 
4 00 
1,052 63 
824 10 


1,127 68 
134 25 


$1,200 00 
146 65 




Printing and binding 




Furniture and carpets 




Wells Fargo 


55 
90 17 






Cartage and freight 




$115 00 


Meetings 




Telegraph and telephones 

Postage 

Permanent improvements 

Book cases and boxes 






2 78 
33 5° 




36 70 
22 75 
1.444 46 


10 00 


218 45 


L. C. cards and A. I,. A 

Traveling expenses... 


257 16 
91 40 








755 80 




Rent 






105 00 
701 64 


Labor 










Exhibit 


1,387 00 
1,994 16 

$6o.399 37 








Miscellaneous 

Totals 


252 09 


25 50 


79 86 


86 53 


$18,138 02 


$2,066 64 


$2,2lS 59 


$1 ,226 62 


$84,049 24 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA, , 
Sacramento County. \ 

I, J. L. Gillis, being duly sworn, on oath depose and say: That I am 
the secretary of the Board of Trustees of the California State Library; 
that the foregoing statement of the expenditures of the State Library 
for the fifty-sixth and fifty-seventh fiscal years, from July 1, 1904, to 
July 1, 1906, is true and correct. 

J. L. GILLIS. 



Subscribed to and sworn to before me, this 12th day of November, 
A. D. 1906. 

ERNEST BRUNCKEN, 
[seal] Notary Public, Sacramento County, California. 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



25 



APPENDIX D. 
NUMBLR OF VOLUMES IN LIBRARY JUNL 30, 1906. 





Number 
at last 
Report. 


Added from July i, 1904, to June 30, 1906. 


Grand 
Total. 


Purchase. 


Exchange. 


Gift. 


Total. 


Main Library, including Law 
and California Historical 
Departments 

Extension Department: 

Traveling Libraries 

Books for Blind 

Total for Extension De- 


126,606 


5,543 


1,140 


1,364 


8,047 


134,653 


4,250 
None 


8,475 
496 


None 
None 


11 
54 


8,486 
550 


12,736 
550 


4,250 


8,971 


None 


65 


9,036 


13,286 


130,856 


i4,5H 


1,140 


1,429 


17,083 


147,939 



APPENDIX L. 
LI5T OF PERIODICALS. 



A. L. A. Booklist 


8 months a year 


Academy 


Weekly 


Albany Law Journal 


Monthly 


American Anthropologist 


Bi-monthly 


American Antiquarian 


Bi-monthly 




Weekly 


American Association for the Advancement of Science. 




American Bankruptcy Reports. Advance sheets 


Monthly 


American Bee Journal 




American Builder's Review 


Monthly 


American Building Association News 


Monthlv 






American Chemical Journal 


Monthly 


American Digest 








American Economic Association Publication 


Quarterly 




Monthly 


American Foundrymen's Association. Transactions 






Weekly 


American Geographical Society. Bulletin 


Monthly 







26 REPORT OF THK STATE LIBRARIAN. 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers. Proceedings Monthly 

American Journal of Archaeology Quarterly 

American Journal of Insanity Quarterly 

American Journal of Medical Sciences Quarterly 

American Journal of Philology Quarterly 

American Journal of Psychology Quarterly 

American Journal of Science Monthly 

American Journal of Sociology Bi-monthly 

American Journal of Theology Quarterly 

American Law Review Bi-monthly 

American Law School Review Irregular 

American Machinist Weekly 

American Mechanic's Advocate Monthly 

American Naturalist Monthly 

American Negligence Reports Bi-monthly 

American Society of Civil Engineers. Transactions Semi-annually 

American Statistical Association. Quarterly Publications Quarterly 

American Veterinary Review Monthly 

Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Science ....Bi-monthly 

Antiquary Monthly 

Anybody's Magazine Monthly 

Appleton's Magazine Monthly 

Architectural Record Monthly 

Archives Diplomatiques Monthly 

Archives of Ophthalmology Bi-monthly 

Archives of Otology Bi-monthly 

Arena Monthly 

Argonaut Weekly 

Army and Navy Journal Weekly 

Army and Navy Life Monthly 

Art Journal and Annual Monthly 

Astronomical Journal Monthly 

Astronomical Society of the Pacific. Proceedings Bi-monthly 

Athenasum Weekly 

Atlantic Monthly Monthly 

Atlantic Reporter Weekly 

Automobile Magazine Monthly 

Banking Law Journal Monthly 

Biblical World Monthly 

Bibliotheca Sacra Quarterly 

Bishop's ABC Guide Monthly 

Blackwood's Magazine Monthly 

Book and News Dealer Monthly 

Book Buyer Monthly 

Book Review Digest Monthly 

Bookman Monthly 

Bookseller (Loudon) Monthly 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal Weekly 

Breeder and Sportsman Weekly 

British Californian Monthly 

Brush and Pencil Monthly 

Bulletin of Bibliography Quarterly 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 27 

Burlington Magazine Monthly 

California Appellate Decisions Bi-weekly 

California Christian Advocate Bi-weekly 

California Cultivator Bi-weekly 

California Decisions Bi-weekly 

California Education Quarterly 

California Fruit Grower Weekly 

California Journal of Technology ... Irregular 

California School Journal Semi-monthly 

California State Journal of Medicine Monthly 

Canada Gazette Weekly 

Canada Law Journal Semi-monthly 

Canadian Criminal Cases Irregular 

Canadian Law Review Monthly 

Canadian Magazine Monthly 

Canadian Society of Civil Engineers. Proceedings Semi-annual 

Canadian Supreme Court reports Irregular 

Case and Comment Monthly 

Cassier's Magazine Monthly 

Catalog of United States Public Documents Monthly 

Catholic World Monthly 

Central Law Journal Weekly 

Century Magazine Monthly 

Chambers' Journal Monthly 

Champlain Society. Publications Irregular 

Chaparral Semi-monthly 

Charities and the Commons Weekly 

Chautauquan Monthly 

Chemical News Weekly 

Church Quarterly Review Quarterly 

Club Life Monthly 

Colorado Scientific Society. Proceedings Quarterly 

Columbia Law Review Monthly 

Commercial and Financial Chronicle Weekly 

Commonwealth Club of California. Transactions Monthly 

Compressed Air Monthly 

Condor Bi-monthly 

Consular and Trade Reports Monthly 

Contemporary Review Monthly 

Cornhill Magazine Monthly 

Cosmopolitan Monthly 

Country Life in America Monthly 

Court of Sessions Cases Irregular 

Craftsman Monthly 

Critic Monthly 

Cumulative Book Index Monthly 

Current Literature Monthly 

Curtis's Botanical Magazine Monthly 

Delineator Monthly 

Deutsche Juristen-Zeitung Semi-monthly 

Dial Semi-monthly 

Dublin Review Quarterly 



28 REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 

Eclectic Magazine Monthly 

Economic Geology Semi-quarterly 

Economic Journal Quarterly 

Economic Review Quarterly 

Edinburgh Review Quarterly 

Education Monthly 

Educational Review Monthly 

Electrical Review (London) Weekly 

Electrical World Weekly 

Engineer (London) Weekly 

Engineering (London) Weekly 

Engineering and Mining Journal Weekly 

Engineering Magazine Monthly 

Engineering News Weekly 

Engineering Record Weekly 

Engiueers' Society of Western Pennsylvania. Proceedings Monthly 

English Historical Review Quarterly 

English Illustrated Magazine Monthly 

Entomologist Monthly 

Everybody's Magazine Monthly 

Expositor (Loudon) Monthly 

Farming Monthly 

Federal Reporter Weekly 

Federation Bulletin Monthly 

Field Columbian Museum. Publications Irregular 

Folk-Lore (London) Quarterly 

For California Monthly 

Forest and Stream Weekly 

Forestry and Irrigation Monthly 

Fortnightly Review Monthly 

Forum Quarterly 

Foundry Monthly 

General Digest (Advance sheets) Bi-monthly 

Gentlemen's Magazine Monthly 

Geographical Journal Monthly 

Geological Magazine Monthly 

Geological Society of America. Bulletin Irregular 

Goodwin's Weekly Weekly 

Green Bag Monthly 

Harper's Bazar Monthly- 
Harper's Monthly Monthly 

Harper's Weekly Weekly 

Hartford Seminary Record Quarterly 

Harvard Graduates' Magazine Quarterly 

Harvard Law Review Monthly 

Hibbert Journal Quarterly 

Idler Monthly 

Imperial and Asiatic Quarterly Review Quarterly 

Impressions Quarterly Quarterly 

Independent Weekly 

Index Medicus Monthly 

Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Proceedings (London) Quarterly 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 29 

Institution of Mining Engineers. Transactions Irregular 

Insurance Law Journal Monthly 

International Bureau of American Republics. Bulletin Monthly 

International Journal of Ethics Quarterly 

International Quarterly Quarterly 

International Studio Monthly- 
Interstate Commerce Reports Irregular 

Iowa Journal of History and Politics Quarterly 

Irish Law Times Weekly 

Irish Monthly Monthly 

Iron Age Weekly 

Irrigation Age Monthly 

Jewish Quarterly Review Quarterly 

Johns Hopkins University Circular Monthly during term 

Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. . . . Monthly 

Journal of American Folk-Lore Quarterly 

Journal of Biblical Literature Semi-annually 

Journal of Cutaneous Diseases Monthly 

Journal of Electricity, Power and Gas Weekly- 
Journal of Geology Semi-quarterly 

Journal of Hellenic Studies Irregular 

Journal of Hygiene Quarterly- 
Journal of Indian Art and Industry Quarterly 

Journal of Mental Science Quarterly 

Journal of Political Economy Monthly 

Journal of Zoophily Monthly 

Journal of the American Chemical Society Monthly 

Journal of the American Medical Association Weekly 

Journal of the American Society of Naval Engineers Quartern- 
Journal of the Anthropological Institute Semi-annually 

Journal of the British Archaeological Association Quarterly 

Journal of the Chemical Society Monthly 

Journal of the Department of Labor (New Zealand) Monthly- 
Journal of the Franklin Institute Monthly 

Journal of the Institution of Electrical Engineers (London) Irregular 

Journal of the Queckett Microscopical Club Irregular 

Journal of the Royal Agricultural Society Annual 

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Quarterly 

Journal of the Royal United Service Institution Monthly 

Journal of the Society of Arts Weekly 

Knowledge and Scientific News Monthly 

Ladies' Home Journal Monthly- 
Lancaster Law Review Weekly 

Lancet Weekly 

Law Journal and Reports Weekly 

Law Journal Reports Monthly- 
Law Notes Monthly 

Law Magazine and Review Quarterly 

Law Times and Reports Weekly 

Law Quarterly Review Quarterly 

Legal Intelligencer and Advance Sheets Weekly 

Library Journal " Monthly 



30 REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 

Library Record Bi-monthly 

Library Work Quarterly 

Lippincott's Magazine Monthly 

Literary Digest Weekly 

Living Age Weekly 

London Quarterly Review Quarterly 

Lutheran Quarterly Quarterly 

McClure's Magazine Monthly 

Macniillan's Magazine Monthly 

Magazine of History Monthly 

Masters in Art Monthly 

Medico-Legal Journal Quarterly 

Merchants' Association Review Monthly 

Mind Quarterly- 
Mines and Minerals Monthly 

Mining Magazine Monthly 

Mining and Scientific Press Weekly 

Missionary Review Monthly 

Modern Language Association of America. Publications Quarterly- 
Modern Philology Quarterly 

Monist Quarterly 

Monitor Weekly 

Month Monthly- 
Monthly Review Monthly 

Moon Magazine Monthly 

Municipal Engineering , Monthly 

Munsey's Magazine Monthly- 
Nation Weekly 

National Civic Federation Review Bi-monthly- 
National Geographic Magazine Monthly- 
National Magazine Monthly 

National Review Monthly- 
Nature Weekly 

New Church Review Quarterly 

New England Historical and Genealogical Register Quarterly 

New England Magazine Months- 
New Hampshire Genealogical Record Quarterly 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Quarterly 

New York Supplement Weekly 

News Letter Weekly 

Nineteenth Century and After Monthly- 
North American Journal of Homoeopathy Monthly- 
North American Review Monthly 

North Eastern Reporter Weekly- 
Northwest Territories Law Reports Irregular 

Northwestern Reporter Weekly 

Northern Crown Monthly 

Notes and Queries Weekly 

Nova Scotia Law Reports Irregular 

Open Court Monthly- 
Out West Monthly- 
Outing Monthly 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 31 

Outlook Weekly 

Overland Monthly Monthly 

Pacific Coast Wood and Iron Monthly- 
Pacific Medical Journal Monthly 

Pacific Monthly Monthly 

Pacific Municipalities Monthly 

Pacific Oil Reporter Weekly 

Pacific Reporter Weekly 

Pacific Rural Press Weekly 

Pacific Wine and Spirit Review Monthly 

Pall Mall Monthly 

Pedagogical Seminary Quarterly 

Pennsylvania Magazine of Histor)* Quarterly 

Petaluma Weekly Poultry Journal Weekly 

Philippine Journal of Science Monthly 

Philosophical Review Bi-monthly 

Photo-Miniature Monthly 

Physical Society of London. Proceedings Quarterly 

Poet Lore Quarterly 

Political Science Quarterly Quarterly 

Popular Astronomy Monthly 

Popular Science Monthly Monthly 

Preston School Outlook Bi-monthly 

Princeton Theological Review Quarterly- 
Progressive Medicine Quarterly 

Psychological Bulletin Monthly 

Psychological Index Annual 

Psychological Review Bi-monthly 

Public Libraries Monthly except August and September 

Publishers' Circular Weekly 

Publishers' Weekly Weekly 

Quarterly Journal of Economics Quarterly 

Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society Quarterly 

Quarterly Journal of the Microscopical Society Quarterly 

Quarterly Review Quarterly 

Railroad Gazette . . . Weekly 

Railway and Locomotive Engineering Monthly 

Railway Master Mechanic Monthly 

Reader Magazine Monthly 

Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature .... Monthly 

Records of the Past Monthly 

Reformed Church Review Quarterly 

Review of Reviews Monthly 

Revue des Deux Mondes Semi-monthly 

St. Nicholas Monthly 

Saturday Review Weekly 

School of Mines Quarterly Quarterly 

School Review Monthly 

Science Weekly 

Scientific American Weekly 

Scientific American Supplement Weekly 

Scottish Law Review Monthly 



32 REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 

Scribner's Magazine Monthly 

Sewanne Review Quarterly 

Shepard's Annotations, New York Court of Appeals Quarterly 

Shepard's Annotations, New York Miscellaneous Quarterly 

Shepard's Annotations, New York Supreme Court Quarterly 

Shepard's Citations. Illinois Supreme and Appellate Court Reports. . . .Quarterly 

Shepard's Citations. Missouri Reports Quarterly 

Shepard's Citations. U. S. Supreme Court Reports Quarterly 

Shepard's Citations of Federal Reporter Quarterly 

Shepard's Citations of Ohio Decisions Quarterly 

South Atlantic Quarterly Quarterly- 
Southeastern Reporter Weekly 

Southern Educational Review Monthly 

Southern Historical Society. Papers Annual 

Southern History Association. Publications Bi-monthly 

Southern Reporter Weekly 

Southwestern Reporter Weekly 

Spectator Weekly- 
Stanford Alumnus Monthly- 
Sugar Beet Monthly- 
Sunset Monthly 

Supreme Court Reporter .Semi-monthly 

Technology Review Quarterly 

Temple Bar Monthly- 
Texas State Historical Association, Quarterly of Quarterly 

Town Talk Weekly 

Treasury Decisions Weekly 

United States Naval Institute. Proceedings Quarterly 

United States Patent Office. Official Gazette Weekly 

United States Supreme Court Opinions Semi-monthly 

University Chronicle. (University of California) Quarterly- 
Veterinary Journal Monthly 

Virginia Magazine Quarterly 

Washington Magazine Monthly 

Wasp Weekly 

Water and Forest Quarterly 

Western Elk ; Monthly 

Western Journal of Education Monthly 

Westminster Review . . Monthly 

Whittier Boys and Girls' Magazine Bi-monthly- 
William and Mary College Quarterly Quarterly 

Woman's Home Companion Monthly- 
World's Work Monthly 

Yale Review Quarterly 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



33 



APPENDIX F. 



LI5T OF NEWSPAPERS. DAILY AND WEEKLY. 



Those marked with an (x) are donated. 

Acton Rooster Monthly (x 

Alturas New Era Weekly (x 

Amador Dispatch . . Weekly (x 

Amador Ledger Weekly (x 

Anaheim Gazette Weekly (x 

Antioch Ledger Weekly (x 

Bakersfield. Morning Echo Daily (x 

Berkeley. Daily Californian Daily (University of California) (x 

Bridgeport Chronicle-Union Weekly (x 

Calaveras Chronicle Weekly ( 

Calaveras Prospect Weekly (x 

Castroville Weekly Enterprise Weekly (x 

Chicago Record-Herald Daily 

Chico Semi-Weekly Record Semi-weekly (x 

Colfax Sentinel Weekly (x 

Colusa Sun Tri-weekly (x 

Concord Transcript Weekly (x 

Contra Costa Gazette Weekly (x 

Contra Costa Standard Weekly (x 

Corona. Press and Horticulturist Weekly (x 

Del Norte Record Weekly (x 

Dixon Tribune ' Weekly (x 

Downieville. Mountain Messenger Weekly (x 

El Dorado Republican Weekly (x 

Escondido Times Weekly (x 

Eureka. Weekly Humboldt Times Weekly 

Folsom Telegraph Weekly (x 

Fresno Morning Republican Daily (x 

Gait Gazette Weekly (x 

Gilroy Advocate Weekly (x 

Grass Valley. Daily Morning Union Daily 

Hanford Sentinel Weekly 

Hawaiian Gazette Semi-weekly 

Inyo Independent Weekly (x) 

La Jolla Breakers Weekly (x) 

Lake County Bee Weekly (x) 

Lassen County. Big Valley Gazette Weekly (x) 

Los Angeles Herald . . Daily 

Los Angeles Times Daily 

Lindsay Gazette Weekly (x) 

Madera Mercury Weekly 

Marin Journal Weekly (x) 

Marin County Tocsin Weekly (x) 

3— LR 



34 REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 

Mariposa Gazette Weekly (x) 

Marysville. Semi-Weekly Appeal Semi-weekly (x) 

Marysville. Daily Democrat Daily 

Masonic Pioneer Weekly (x) 

Mendocino Beacon Weekly (x) 

Merced Express Weekly (x) 

Milwaukee. Social-Democratic Herald Weekly (x) 

Milwaukee. Vorwaerts Weekly (x) 

New York. Evening Post Daily 

Newcastle News Weekly (x) 

Oak Park Ledger Weekly (x) 

Oakland Enquirer Daily (x) 

Oakland Times Daily (x) 

Oakland Tribune Daily (x) 

Oxnard Courier Weekly (x) 

Palo Altan Weekly (x) 

Pasadena Daily News Daily (x) 

Placer Herald Weekly (x) 

Placer County Republican Weekly 

Placerville Nugget Daily (x) 

Placerville Weekly Nugget Weekly (x) 

Plumas National Bulletin Semi-weekly (x) 

Portland. Morning Oregonian Daily 

Red Bluff News Weekly (x) 

Redding. Courier-Free Press Daily 

Redlands. Citrograph Weekly (x) 

Redwood City Democrat Weekly (x) 

Redwood City. Times-Gazette Weekly (x) 

Reno Evening Gazette Daily (x) 

Rio Vista. River News .. Weekly (x) 

Sacramento. Evening Bee (2 copies) Daily 

Sacramento Journal Weekly (x) 

Sacramento Star Daily 

Sacramento. Sunday Evening Leader Weekly (x) 

Sacramento Union (2 copies) Daily 

Sacramento. Wednesday Press Weekly 

St. Helena Star Weekly (x) 

Salinas Index Daily (x) 

Salinas Weekly Journal Weekly (x) 

San Benito Advance Weekly (x) 

San Diegan-Sun Daily 

San Diego. Evening Tribune Daily (x) 

San Diego Union Daily 

San Francisco Bulletin Daily 

San Francisco Call (2 copies) Daily 

San Francisco Chronicle (2 copies) Daily 

San Francisco Examiner (2 copies) Daily 

San Francisco Post Daily 

San ]os€ Mercury Daily 

San Luis Obispo. Semi-Weekly Breeze Semi-weekly (x) 

San Luis Obispo Times Weekly (x) 

San Luis Obispo Tribune Semi-weekly (x) 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 35 

San Mateo Leader Weekly (x) 

San Mateo Times Weekly (x) 

Santa Barbara. Weekly Press Weekly 

Santa Clara News Weekly (x) 

Santa Cruz Surf Weekly (x) 

Santa Rosa. Press Democrat Daily (x) 

Santa Rosa. Republican Daily 

Seattle Post Intelligencer Daily 

Sonora. Union Democrat Weekly (x) 

Stanford University. Daily Palo Alto Daily (x) 

Stanislaus County Weekly News Weekly (x) 

Stockton Mail Daily (x) 

Summary. (Elmira, N. Y.) Weekly (x) 

Sutter County Farmer Weekly (x) 

Sutter Independent Weekly (x) 

Trinity Journal Weekly (x) 

Truckee Semi-Weekly Republican Semi-weekly (x) 

Tulare County Times Weekly (x) 

Ventura Free Press Weekly (x) 

Willows Review Weekly (x) 

Winters Express Weekly (x) 

Woodland Democrat Weekly 

Yreka Journal Weekly 



36 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



APPENDIX H. 

PUBLIC, MISCELLANEOUS, AND TRAVELING LIBRARIES, 

1904. 

Arranged alphabetically by towns. 

T indicates Traveling library. P indicates Public library. indicates incorporated town. 

• indicates reading room or library supported by voluntary subscription. 



Adin T 


Greenville I 


1 _ All. T"» 

Palo Alto P + 


Alameda P + 


Guerneville T 


Pasadena P + 


Alamitos * 


Hall Town T 


Paso Robles P T + 


Alturas T + 


Hanford P + 


Penryn T 


Anaheim P + 


Hayward P + 


Perris * 


Areata T + 


Healdsburg P + 


Petaluma P + 


Auburn T + 


Highland * 


Pomona P + 


Azusa P + 


Hollister P + 


Porterville T + 


Bakersfield P + 


Kern City P + 


Ramona * 


Ball's Ferry T 


La Jolla * 


Red Bluff P + 


Barstow * 


La Moine T 


Redding P + 


Belmont T 


Laton * 


KealaiiQs r + 


Berkeley P + 


Linden T 


Redoudo P + 


Biggs T + 


Livermore T + 


Redwood City P + 


Boulder Creek *T + 


Lodi * T 


Richmond » 


Buntingville T 


Lompoc * T + 


Riverside P + 


Calistoga P T + 


Long Beach P + 


Rock Creek T 


Campbell * 


Lordsburg * 


Roseville I 


Carpinteria T 


Los Angeles P + 


Sacramento P + 


Castella T 


Los Gatos P + 


Salinas * T + 


Ceres T 


Madera * 


San Bernardino P + 


Chico P + 


Martinez * + 


San Diego P + 


Clarksburg T 


Marysville * + 


San Dimas * T 


Colusa P + 


Missouri Flat T 


San Francisco P + 


Corona P + 


Modesto T + 


San Jose' P + 


Coronado P + 


Monrovia P + 


San Juan * T + 


Covina P + 


Monterey * + 


San Luis Obispo P + 


Cucamonga T 


Napa P + 


San Mateo P + 


Davis T 


National City P + 


San Pedro P + 


Dunsmuir * 


Needles * 


San Rafael P + 


Elk Grove T 


Nevada City P + 


St. Helena P + 


Escondido P + 


Nordhoff * 


Santa Ana P + 


Eureka P + 


Oakdale * 


Santa Barbara P + 


Farmington T 


Oakland P + 


Santa Clara P + 


Ferndale T + 


Ontario P + 


Santa Cruz P + 


Fowler * 


Orange P + 


Santa Monica P + 


Fresno P + 


Oroville * 


Santa Rosa P + 


Fullerton T + 


Pacific Grove * + 


Sebastopol T + 


Glenn T 


Palermo T 


Sierra Madre * 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



37 



Sonoma T + 
Sonora * + 
South Pasadena P + 
Stockton P + 
Susauville T + 
Tulare P + 



Upland * 
Vallejo P + 
Ventura P + 
Veterans' Home T 
Visalia P + 
Vorden T 



Watsonville P + 
Whittier P + 
Winters * T + 
Woodland P + 



APPENDIX I. 



PUBLIC, MISCELLANEOUS, AND TRAVELING LIBRARIES, 

1904. 

Arranged alphabetically by counties. 



T indicates Traveling library. P indicates Public library. + indicates incorporated town. 

* indicates reading room or library supported by voluntary subscription. 



ALAMEDA. 

Alameda P + 
Berkeley P + 
Hayward P + 
Livermore P + 
Oakland P + 

Alpine. 

Amador. 

Butte. 
Biggs T + 
Chico P + 
Oroville * 
Palermo T 

Calaveras. 

Colusa. 
Colusa P + 

Contra Costa. 
Martinez * + 
Richmond * 

Del Norte. 

El Dorado. 

Missouri Flat T 

Fresno. 
Fowler * 
Fresno P + 
Laton * 

Glenn. 
Glenn T 

Humboldt. 
Areata P + 



Humboldt. 
Eureka P + 
Ferndale T + 

Inyo. 

Kern. 

Bakersfield P + 
Kern City P + 

Kings. 

Hanford P + 

Lake. 

Lassen. 

Buntingville T 
Hall Town T 
Susanville T + 

Los Angeles. 
Alamitos * 
Azusa P + 
Covina P + 
Long Beach P + 
Lordsburg * 
Los Angeles P + 
Monrovia P + 
Pasadena P + 
Pomona P + 
Redondo P + 
San Dimas * T 
San Pedro P + 
Santa Monica P + 
Sierra Madre * 
South Pasadena P + 



Madera. 

Madera * 
Marin. 

San Rafael P + 
Mariposa. 
Mendocino. 
Merced. 
Modoc. 

Adin T 

Alturas T + 
Mono. 
Monterey. 

Monterey * + 

Pacific Grove * + 

Salinas * T + 
Napa. 

Calistoga P T + 

Napa P + 

St. Helena P + 

Veterans' Home T 
Nevada. 

Nevada City P + 
Orange. 

Anaheim P + 

Fullerton T + 

Orange P + 

Santa Ana P + 
Placer. 

Auburn T + 

Penryn T 



38 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



Placer. 

Roseville T 
Plumas. 

Greenville T 
Riverside. 

Corona P + 

Perris * 

Riverside P + 
Sacramento. 

Elk Grove T 

Sacramento P + 

Vorden T 
San Benito. 

Hollister P + 

San Juan * T + 
San Bkrnardino. 

Barstow * 

Cucamouga T 

Highland * 

Needles * 

Ontario P + 

Redlands P + 

San Bernardino P + 

Upland * 
San Diego. 

Coronado P + 

Escondido P + 

LaJolla * 

National City P + 

Ramona * 

San Diego P + 
San Francisco. 

San Francisco P + 
San Joaquin. 

Farniington T 



San Joaquin. 

Linden T 

Lodi * T 

Stockton P + 
San Luis Obispo. 

Paso Robles P T + 

San Luis Obispo P + 
San Mateo. 

Belmont T 

Redwood City P + 

San Mateo P + 
Santa Barbara. 

Carpinteria T 

Lompoc T * + 

Santa Barbara P + 
Santa Clara. 

Campbell * 

Los Gatos P + 

Palo Alto P + 

San Jos6 P + 

Santa Clara P + 
Santa Cruz. 

Boulder Creek * T + 

Santa Cruz P + 

Watson ville P + 
Shasta. 

Ball's Ferry T 

Castella T 

La Moine T 

Redding P + 

Rock Creek T 
Sierra. 
Siskiyou. 

Dunsrnuir * 



Solano. 
Vallejo P + 

Sonoma. 

Guerneville T 
Healdsburg P + 
Petaluma P + 
Santa Rosa P + 
Sebastopol T + 
Sonoma T + 

Stanislaus. 
Ceres T 
Modesto T + 
Oakdale * 

Sutter. 

Tehama. 

Red Bluff P + 

Trinity. 

Tulare. 

Porterville T + 
Tulare P + 
Visalia P + 

Tuolumne. 
Sonora • + 

Ventura. 
Nordhoff * 
Ventura P + 

Yolo. 

Clarksburg T 
Davis T 
Winters * T + 
Woodland P + 

Yuba. 

Marysville * + 



APPLNDIX G. 




APPLNDIX G. 




T indicates a Traveling library. 

P indicates an incorporated town with a public library. 

A white square with black dot indicates an incorporated 
town with reading room or library supported by voluntary 
subscription. 

A white circle with a black dot indicates an unincor- 
porated town with reading room or library supported by 
voluntary subscriptions 




< I? 



1 ^ 



N 

j \ z 

m 



H X I <** O ) 



Public, Miscellaneous and Traveling Libraries, 1906. 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



39 



APPENDIX J. 

PUBLIC, MISCELLANEOUS, AND TRAVELING LIBRARIES, 

1906. 

Arranged alphabetically by towns. 

T indicates Traveling library. P indicates Public library. + indicates incorporated town. 

* indicates reading room or library supported by voluntary subscription. 



Acampo T 


Boulder Creek * T + 


Cottonwood T 


Adin T 


Bowman T 


Covina P + 


Ager T 


Bridgeport T 


Crescent City T 


Agua Caliente T 


Buena Park T 


Crescent Mills T 


Alameda P + 


Buntingville T 


Crow's Landing T 


Alamitos * 


Calistoga P T + 


Cuba T 


Albion T 


Cameron T 


Cucamonga T 


Alta T 


Camino T 


Darwin T 


Alturas * T + 


Camp Meeker T 


Davis * T 


Alvord T 


Campbell * 


Delmorma District T 


Amnesti District T 


Camptonville T 


Diamond Springs T 


Anaheim P + 


Carlsbad T 


Dinuba P T + 


Angel's Camp T 


Carpinteria T 


Dixon P T + 


Antioch T + 


Castella T 


Dos Palos T 


Areata P + 


Castroville T 


Douglas City T 


Arroyo Grande T 


Ceres T 


Downieville T 


Arthur T 


Chico P + 


Downey * 


Auburn P T + 


Chino T 


Dry Creek T 


Azusa P + 


Chualar T 


Dunsmuir * 


Baird T 


Cinnabar District T 


El Centro T 


Ball's Ferry T 


Clarksburg T 


El Monte T 


Bakersfield P + 


Cloverdale T + 


Elk Grove T 


Barstow * 


Clovis T 


Elsinore P T + 


Beaumont T 


Coachella T 


Escondido P + 


Beckwith T 


Coalinga * + 


Etna P T + 


Belmont T 


Cobb Valley Lake T 


Eucalyptus District T 


Ben Lomond T 


Collinsville T 


Eureka P + 


Benicia P T + 


Coloma T 


Fairfield T + 


Bennett Valley T 


Colton P + 


Fall River Mills T 


Berkeley P + 


Colusa P + 


Fallbrook T 


Bidwell's Bar T 


Compton T 


Farmington T 


Bieber T 


Coon Hollow T 


Ferndale P T + 


Big Oak Flat T 


Coppe'-opolis T 


Fernley T 


Biggs P T + 


Cordelia T 


Fillmore T 


Bishop T + 


Corning T 


Florin T 


Bishop Township T 


Corona P + 


Forest ville T 


Black Diamond T + 


Coronado P + 


Fort Dick District T 


Bloomingdale T 


Cotati T 


Fort Jones T + 



40 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



Fort Rouiie T 
Fortuua * + 
Fowler * T 
French Camp T 
Fresno P + 
Fullerton P T + 
Fulton T 
Gait T 
Geyserville T 
Gilroy P T + 
Glendale * T + 
Glendora * T 
Glenn T 
Gold Run T 
Gonzales T 
Good Luck T 
Grangeville T 
Grant District T 
Green Valley T 
Green Valley District T 
Greenfield T 
Greenville T 
Groveland T 
Guerneville T 
Hall Town T 
Han ford P + 
Hayfork T 
Hayward P + 
Healdsburg P + 
Hemet * T 
Highland * 
Hobart Mills T 
Hollister P + 
Hollywood P T 
Holtville * T 
Hopland T 
Hornbrook T 
Independence T 
Ingot T 
Irviugton T 
Jackson T + 
Janesville T 
Jenny Lind T 
Jersey T 
Johnsville T 
Jolon T 
Junction City T 
Kelseyville T 
Kern City P + 
Kernville T 
King City T 
Kingsburg T 
Lagunita District T 



Lajolla * 
La Mesa T 
La Mirada T 
La Moine T 
La Pauza T 
Lakeport T + 
Laton * 
Latonville T 
Leightons T 
Lemoore T + 
Lewiston T 
Likely T 
Lincoln P + 
Linden T 
Little Shasta T 
Live Oak District T 
Livermore P + 
Lockwood T 
Lodi * T 

Lonia Pilon District T 
Lonipoc * T + 
Lone Tree District T 
Long Beach P + 
Long Valley T 
Looniis T 
Lordsburg * 
Los Angeles P + 
Los Gatos P + 
Loyalton T + 
Lower Lake T 
McKittrick T 
Madera * X 
Magalia T 
Manzanita District T 
Marcuin District T 
Maricopa T 
Mariposa T 
Markleeville T + 
Martinez * + 
Marysville * + 
Mendocino State Hosp. 
Merced PT + 
Meridian T 
Middletown T 
Milford T 
Mill Valley T + 
Milton T 
Missouri Flat T 
Modesto P + 
Monrovia P 
Montague T 
Monterey P + 
Morro T 



Mound City T 
Mount Olivet T 
Mountain Ranch T 
Mountain View P T 
Napa P + 
Napa State Hospital 
National City P + 
Needles * 
Nestor T 
Nevada City P + 
Newcastle T 
New Hope T 
New Mohawk T 
Nicolaus T 
Niles * T 
Nordhoff * 
North Fork T 
North Sau Juan T 
Novato T 
Oak Grove T 
Oakdale * 
Oakland P + 
Oakville T 
Occidental T 
Ocean Park * + 
Oceano T 
Oceanside P + 
Oleander T 
Olig District T 
O'Neals T 
Ontario P + 
Orange P + 
Oriole T 
Orland T 
Oroville * + 
Oxnard P + 
Pacific Grove P + 
Palermo T 
Palo Alto P + 
Parkfield T 
Pasadena P + 
Paso Robles PT + 
Payran District T 
Penobscot District T 
Penryn T 
Perris * 
Petaluma P + 
Pierce Road District 
Pike T 
Pinole T + 
Pittsburg Landing T 
Pittsville T 
Placerville P T + 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



Pleasanton T + 
Point Reyes Station T 
Pomona P + 
Porterville P T + 
Poway T 
Princeton T 
Providence Mine T 
Quartz T 
Quicksilver T 
Quincy * 
Ramona * 
Raymond T 
Red Bluff P + 
Redding P + 
Redlands P + 
Redondo P + 
Redwood City P + 
Redwood District T 
Rescue T 
Richmond * + 
Rio Vista T + 
Riverside P + 
Rock Creek T 
Rocklin PT + 
Rosedale T 
Roseville T 
Round Valley T 
Ryer Island T 
Sacramento P + 
St. Helena P + 
St. John T 
Salinas P T + 
San Andreas T 
San Bernardino P + 
San Diego P + 
San Dimas * T 
San Francisco P + 
San Jacinto T + 
San Jos€ P + 



San Juan P T + 
San Leandro P T + 
San Luis Obispo P + 
San Mateo P + 
San Pedro P + 
San Rafael P + 
Santa Ana P + 
Santa Barbara P + 
Santa Clara P + 
Santa Cruz P + 
Santa Marguerita T 
Santa Monica P + 
Santa Paula T + 
Santa Rosa P + 
Saratoga T 
Sausalito P + 
Sawtelle * 
Sebastopol T + 
Selma P + 
Shandon T 
Sierra Madre * 
Sierraville T 
Silsbee T 
Sisson T + 
Skyland T 
Slatington T 
Slough District T 
Snelling T 
Soledad T 
Sonoma * T + 
Sonora * T + 
Soquel T 
Soulsbyville T 
South Pasadena P + 
Standish T 
Stirling City T 
Stockton P + 
Stony Ford T 
Suisun P + 



Sunnyvale T 
Sunol T 
Susanville T + 
Sutter T 
Sutter Creek T 
Taylorsville T 
Tehachapi T 
Tehama T + 
Templeton T 
Thalheim T 
Tropico * T 
Tulare P + 
Two Rock T 
Ukiah P T + 
Upland * T + 
Vacaville P + 
Vallejo P + 
Ventura P + 
Veterans' Home T 
Visalia P + 
Vorden T 
Wakefield T 
Washington Colony 
Wasioja T 
Watsonville P + 
Waugh T 
Weaverville T 
West Butte T 
West Fallbrook T 
Wheatland T + 
Whittier P + 
Willits P T + 
Willows P T + 
Winchester T 
Wiuship District T 
Winters * T + 
Woodland P + 
Yreka T + 



42 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



APPENDIX K. 



PUBLIC, MISCELLANEOUS, AND TRAVELING LIBRARIES, 

1906. 

Arranged alphabetically by counties. 



T indicates Traveling library. P indicates Public library. + indicates incorporated town. 

* indicates reading room or library' supported by voluntary subscription. 



Alameda. 


Contra Costa. 




Glenn. 




Alameda P + 


Black Diamond T 


+ 


Willows P T + 




Berkeley P + 


Jersey T 




Humboldt. 




Hayward P + 


Lone Tree District 


T 


Areata P + 




Irvington P 


Martinez * + 




Eureka P + 




Livermore P + 


Pinole T + 




Ferndale P T + 




Niles * T 


Pittsburg Landing 


T 


Fortuna * + 




Oakland P + 


Richmond * + 




Inyo. 




Pleasanton T + 


Del Norte 




Bishop T + 




San Leandro P T + 


Crescent City T + 




Bishop Township 


T 


Sunol 


Fort Dick District 


T 


Darwin T 




Alpine. 


Redwood District 


T 


Independence T 




Markleeville T + 


Wakefield T 




Round Valley T 




Amador. 


El Dorado. 




Kern. 




Jackson T + 


Camino T 




Bakersfield P + 




Sutter Creek T 


Coloma T 




Cameron T 




Butte. 


Coon Hollow T 




Kern City P + 




Bidwell's Bar T 


Diamond Springs 


T 


Kernville T 




Biggs P T + 


Good Luck T 




McKittrick T 




Bloomingdale T 


Missouri Flat T 




Maricopa T 




Chico P + 


Penobscot District 


T 


Olig District T 




Magalia T 


Placerville P T + 




Tehachapi T 




Oroville * + 


Rescue T 




Kings. 




Palermo T 


Slatington T 




Grangeville T 




Stirling City T 


Fresno. 




Hanford P + 




Calaveras. 


Clovis T 




Lemoore T + 




Angel's Camp T 


Coalinga * + 




Lake. 




Copperopolis T 


Fowler * T 




Cobb Valley Lake 


T 


Jenny Lind T 


Fresno P + 




Kelseyville T 




Milton T 


Kingsburg T 




Lakeport T + 




Mountain Ranch T 


Laton * 




Lower Lake T 




San Andreas T 


Oleander T 




Middletown T 




Colusa. 


Selma P + 




Quicksilver T 




Colusa P + 


Washington Colony T 


Lassen. 




Princeton T 


Glenn. 




Bieber T 




Stony Ford T 


Glenn T 




Buntingville T 




Contra Costa. 


Orland T 




Cuba T 




Antioch T + 


St. John T 




Hall Town T 





REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



43 



Lassen. 

Janesville T 

Long Valley T 

Mil ford T 

Standish T 

Susanville T + 
Los Angeles. 

Alamitos * 

Azusa P + 

Compton T 

Covina P 4- 

Downey * 

El Monte T 

Glendale * T + 

Glendora * T 

Hollywood P T + 

La Mirada T 

Long Beach P + 

Lordsburg * 

Los Angeles P + 

Monrovia P + 

Ocean Park * + 

Pasadena P + 

Pomona P + 

Redondo P + 

San Dimas * T 

San Pedro P + 

Santa Monica P + 

Sawtelle * 

Sierra Madre * 

South Pasadena P + 

Tropico * T 

Whittier P + 
Madera. 

Madera * T 

O'Neals T 

North Fork 

Raymond 
Marin. 

Mill Valley T + 

Novato T 

Point Reyes Station T 

San Rafael P + 

Sausalito P + 
Mariposa. 

Mariposa T 
Mendocino. 

Albion T 

Arthur T 

Hopland T 

Laytonville T 

Mendocino State Hosp. 

Ukiah P T + 

Willits P T + 



Merced. 

Dos Palos T 

Merced P T + 

Snelling T 
Modoc. 

Adin T 

Alturas * T + 

Delmorma District T 

Likely T 
Mono. 

Bridgeport T 
Monterey. 

Castroville T 

Chualar T 

Fort Romie T 

Gonzales T 

Greenfield T 

Jolon T . 

King City T 

Lagunita District T 

Lockwood T 

Monterey P + 

Pacific Grove P + 

Parkfield T 

Salinas P T + 

Soledad T 
Napa. 

Calistoga PT + 

Dry Creek T 

Napa P + 

Napa State Hospital T 

Oakville T 

St. Helena P + 

Veterans' Home T 
Nevada. 

Fernley T 

Hobart Mills T 

Nevada City P + 

North San Juan T 
Orange. 

Anaheim P + 

Buena Park T 

Fullerton PT + 

Orange P + 

Santa Ana P + 
Placer. 

Alta T 

Auburn P T + 

Bowman T 

Gold Run T 

Lincoln P + 
T Loomis T 

Peuryn T 

Newcastle T 



Placer. 

Rocklin P T 

Rosedale T 

Roseville T 
Plumas. 

Beckwith T 

Crescent Mills T 

Greenville T 

Johnsville T 

Mound City T 

New Mohawk T 

Quincy * 

Taylorsville T 
Riverside. 

Alvord T 

Beaumont T 

Coachella T 

Corona P + 

Elsinore PT + 

Hemet * T 

Perris * 

Riverside P + 

San Jacinto T + 

Winchester T 
Sacramento. 

Elk Grove T 

Florin T 

Gait T 

Sacramento P + 

Vorden T 
San Benito. 

Hollister P + 

Live Oak District T 

San Juan P T + 
San Bernardino. 

Barstow * 

Chino T 

Colton P + 

Cucamonga T 

Highland * 

Needles * 

Ontario P + 

Redlands P + 

San Bernardino P + 

Upland * T + 
San Diego. 

Carlsbad T 

Coronado P + 

El Centro T 

Escondido P + 

Eucalyptus District T 

Fallbrook T 

Holtville » T 

La Jolla * 



44 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



San Diego. 


Santa Clara. 


Sonoma. 


La Mesa T 


Saratoga T 


Bennett Valley T 


National City P + 


Sunnyvale T 


Camp Meeker T 


Nestor T 


Santa Cruz. 


Cinnabar District T 


Oceanside P + 


Amnesti District T 


Cloverdale T + 


Poway T 


Ben Lomond T 


Cotati T 


Ratuona * 


Boulder Creek * T + 


Forestville T 


San Diego P + 


Santa Cruz P + 


Fulton T 


Silsbee T 


Skyland T 


Geyserville T 


West Fallbrook T 


Soquel T 


Green Valley T 


San Francisco. 


Watsonville P + 


Green Valley District 


San Francisco P + 


Shasta. 


Guerneville T 


San Joaquin. 


Baird T 


Healdsburg P + 


Acampo T 


Ball's Ferry T 


Manzanita District T 


Farmington T 


Castella T 


Mount Olivet T 


French Camp T 


Fall River Mills T 


Occidental T 


Linden T 


Ingot T 


Payran District T 


Lodi * T 


La Moine T 


Petaluma P + 


New Hope T 


Leightons T 


Santa Rosa P + 


Stockton P + 


Pittville T 


Sebastopol T + 


San Luis Obispo. 


Redding P + 


Sonoma * T + 


Arroyo Grande T 


Rock Creek T 


Two Rock T 


La Panza T 


Sierra. 


Waugh T 


Loma Pilon District T 


Downieville T 


Stanislaus. 


Morro T 


Loyalton T + 


Ceres T 


Oceano T 


Pike T 


Crow's Landing T 


Paso Robles PT + 


Sierraville T 


Modesto P + 


San Luis Obispo P + 


Siskiyou. 


Oakdale * 


Santa Margarita T 


Ager T 


Thalheim T 


Shaudon T 


Dunsmuir * 


Sutter. 


Templeton T 


Etna P T + 


Cottonwood T 


San Mateo. 


Fort Jones T + 


Grant District T 


Belmont T 


Hornbrook T 


Marcum District T 


Redwood City P + 


Little Shasta T 


Meridian T 


San Mateo P + 


Montague T 


Nicolaus T 


Santa Barbara. 


Sisson T + 


Slough District T 


Carpinteria T 


Yreka T + 


Sutter T 


Lompoc * T + 


Solano. 


West Butte T 


Santa Barbara P + 


Benicia P T + 


Winship District T 


Wasioja T 


Collinsville T 


Tehama. 


Santa Clara. 


Cordelia T 


Corning T 


Campbell * 


Dixon P T + 


Red Bluff P + 


Gilroy P T + 


Fairfield T + 


Tehama T + 


Los Gatos P + 


Rio Vista T + 


Trinity. 


Mountain View P T + 


Ryer Island T 


Douglas City T 


Oak Grove T 


Suisun P + 


Hayford T 


Palo Alto P + 


Vacaville P + 


Junction City T 


Pierce Road District T 


Vallejo P + 


Lewiston T 


San Josi P + 


Sonoma. 


Oriole T 


Santa Clara P + 


Agua Caliente T 


Weaverville T 



REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN. 



Tulare. 

Dinuba P T + 

Porter ville P T + 

Tulare P + 

Visalia P + 
Tuolumne. 

Big Oak Flat T 

Groveland T 

Providence Mine T 

Quartz T 



Tuolumne. 
Sonora * T + 
Soulsbyville T 

Ventura. 
Fillmore T 
Nordhoff P 
Oxnard P 
Santa Paula T 
Saticoy T 
Ventura P 



Yolo. 
Clarksburg T 
Davis T 
Winters * T - 
Woodland P 

Yuba. 

Camptonville 
Marysville * 
Wheatland T 



i